OPRD RULES NO TO BPRD AMENDMENTS

BEND, OR –– In recent years, the BPRD has petitioned the OPRD Commission to amend the rule to allow a pedestrian crossing.

The current Oregon Administrative rules prohibit any construction on the Deschutes River. In response to the petition by BPRD, OPRD reviewed waterway rules, bringing experts in recreation, land management, and fish and wildlife, together with members of the community adjacent to the scenic waterway. Steps in the public process included the convening of an advisory group, open house public meetings, and an online survey.

On May 5, 2017 following the release of the Community Solutions Report, the consensus of this extensive public process was to not pursue an amendment to allow bridges, thereby protecting Oregon Scenic Waterways.

In supporting the decision, OPRD Director Lisa Sumption commented on the importance of the long withstanding protections and how they outweigh the destruction hat would be caused by the development requested by BPRD, "As important as recreation is to our mission, it has to be balanced with our need to protect resources that make recreation possible. Changing rules, especially in a way that might encourage more visible riverside development, is contrary to the purpose of the scenic waterway system.”

 

MEMBERS OF BPRD BOARD QUESTION MEDIA INVOLVEMENT

BEND, OR –– Bend Parks and Recreation (BPRD) Board of Directors questioned staff involvement with recent Bend Bulletin editorials.

In response to an editorial written by BPRD Board Member Ted Schoenborn, fellow Board Member Lauren Sprang opposed the material. In an internal email, Ms. Sprang suggested it was unrepresentative of BPRD, commenting, “it uses a similar tone of communication that was used previously, which I’m not sure worked for BPRD as well as it could have.”

Moreover Sprang suggested the media should not be used to accomplish personal objectives stating, ““... I would have loved to see a tone of transparency with a goal of building trust, such as a statement about how the board feels...instead, this sounds like a piece of advocacy to me.”

Nevertheless despite the direction to limit media involvement, BPRD Director Don Horton has continued to exert influence. As recently as January 2018, Horton continued correspondence with reporters at the Bend Bulletin including editor Erik Lukens. In an internal email, Horton suggested writing material that would undermine opposition to BPRD pedestrian bridge including articles such as, “Class war in the American west: the rich landowners blocking access to public lands.”

In the weeks following Lukens complied with Horton and would continue to write an article “Environmentalists vs Urban Trails” condemning local landowners, “It’s easy to understand why the wealthy owners of riverside homes near the bridge site would support HB 4029. They’ve bought their pieces of paradise, and they’d like to mmaintain its exclusivity.”

With Don Horton continues to use editorials to support personal objectives, it suggests serious conflict of interests within BPRD. The Board of Directors should expect higher standards from its employees.

MAJOR ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS LEAD EFFORTS TO PROTECT THE UPPER DESCHUTES SCENIC WATERWAY

BEND, –– The BPRD continues to threaten long withstanding property rights and environmental protections. In response, a bipartisan coalition has come together in support of Oregon’s State Scenic Waterways.

The coalition includes such organizations as Central Oregon Land Watch, Oregon Wild, Oregon League of Conservation Voters, Sierra Club, Trout Unlimited and Oregonians in Action.

Through uniting these local organizations, the coalition will continue to support long withstanding environmental protections, such as the prevention of new bridges within the Upper Deschutes River Corridor.

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THE BEND PARKS AND RECREATION DEPARTMENT REPRIMANDED FOR ETHICAL ACUSATIONS

BEND, OR – OPRD Director Lisa Sumption reprimanded BPRD Director Don Horton,  following accusations of unethical conduct.

The current Oregon Administrative rules prohibit any construction on the Deschutes River. In recent years, BPRD has petitioned the OPRD Commission to amend the rule to allow a pedestrian crossing. In response, OPRD reviewed waterway rules, bringing experts in recreation, land management, and fish and wildlife, together with members of the community adjacent to the scenic waterway. Steps in the public process included the convening of an advisory group, open house public meetings, and an online survey.

In April 2017, following correspondence with state representatives and members of the community, staff members of Bend Parks and Recreation Department ascertained the rules would not be reopened. In a conversation with Associate Director Chris Havel, Don Horton, after assuming they would be reopened questioned Oregon Parks and Recreation Department and suggested that he had been deceived.

Lisa Sumption responded strongly to Mr. Horton, stating internally, “this is the second time that you have called into question our staff’s integrity and honesty.” She continued to highlight the community’s concerns and increasing opposition to the bridge, “after serious consideration, and hearing from the community that there were serious concerns about weakening scenic waterway protections.”

Additionally, Ms. Sumption underlined the department's position and its responsibility for overseeing many different regulations. “OPRD's portfolio is much larger than just the recreation policy area. We are also charged with the legislative authority to oversee and regulate the State Scenic Waterway program, which many times puts us in a regulatory role and a responsibility to protect the entire scenic waterway program, not just the recreational benefits.” she continued “OPRD has no plans at this time to try and amend the rules, and I will not make another decision on this question until after digesting the report.”

 

HOUSE VOTES UNANIMOUSLY TO STRENGTHEN ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTIONS ON THE UPPER DESCHUTES RIVER

BEND, OR – It's Unanimous.

The Oregon Legislature took another step forward in environmental protection, uniting conservationists and homeowners in Central Oregon. The House voted 54-0 to ban new bridge construction in a sensitive portion of the Upper Deschutes Scenic Waterway.

The issues are clear, as are BPRD's actions. In spite of BPRD's Chairman Ted Schoenborn’s lobbying, the entire voting legislative body sent a message loud and clear. Keep your hands off the State Scenic Waterway in the Upper Deschutes. No Bridges Period!

"It's amazing in this day and age of such partisan bickering Oregonians came together to protect our environment and private property from an agency out of control." Said Tim Phillips a member of the Upper Deschutes Conservation Council. "We expect BPRD will still not get the message and continue to advance their agenda over long standing environmental protections."

BPRD will likely try to usurp environmental groups, private landowners and the entire Oregon House of Representatives all in the name of watering down long standing environmental laws.

HB 2027-A strengthens environmental protections under the Oregon Scenic Waterways Act by prohibiting new bridge construction in a portion of the Upper Deschutes Scenic Waterway. This bill directly follows the advice of a 2015 Oregon Fish and Wildlife opinion explicitly opposing new bridges and heavy recreational use in this area. The subject area contains critical habitat for the ESA threatened Oregon spotted frog, and was identified by ODFW as containing vital wintering habitat for rocky mountain elk and mule deer. HB 2027-A has been broadly supported by Central Oregon conservation groups and homeowners.

REPRESENTATIVES WHISNANT AND CLEM SUPPORT LOCAL CONSERVATIONIST EFFORTS

BEND, OR – The House Committee on Agriculture and Natural Resources has voted unanimously to pass a bill strengthening environmental protections under the Oregon Scenic Waterways Act. In doing so, members of the committee have sent a message to a local parks district brazenly operating in contravention of state biologists and the Oregon Scenic Waterways Act. HB 2027-1 represents a bi-partisan effort by representatives Brian Clem and Gene Whisnant to support Bend conservationists who have been excluded and disregarded by the Bend Park and Recreation District.

Spearheaded by conservationists, environmentalists, scientists, and landowners, HB 2027-1 aims to strengthen environmental protections in the Upper Deschutes Scenic Waterway. Specifically, this bill aims to elevate a longstanding prohibition on new bridges in undeveloped natural areas along the Deschutes. This bridge prohibition has existed for over 20 years, and is founded in the Upper Deschutes Comprehensive Management Plan: a collaborative state and federal effort to protect the Upper Deschutes.

Citizens and environmental groups have been concerned that new BPRD bridges in undeveloped areas will create adverse environmental impacts through high user traffic. During a 2015 OPRD rulemaking and comment process, comments opposed to abolishing the bridge prohibition significantly outnumbered comments in favor. Just this month, prominent environmental group Oregon Wild submitted a letter to OPRD opposing abolishment of the Upper Deschutes bridge prohibition.